Cat Rescue:

Give Him a Second Chance 


“Chance” was found near PetSmart in Monroe, MI and brought into the store. Friends of Companion Animals (FoCA) cat rescue center was called to see if we could help him. A microchip scan revealed that he is been adopted in August 2017 at four months old to a home in Southfield Michigan from a rescue located in Walled Lake, Michigan. His adopters didn’t report him missing and they had him declawed, which is against the organization’s policies. Because of this contract breach, the rescue has retained custody of Chance.

Since he is now back in their possession, they are responsible for his medical costs and care. In fact his original foster from when he was a kitten will be fostering him during his recovery. After the veterinarian examination, it appears that his jaw is dislocated or broken. They surmised that the injuries he sustained are consistent with riding under or inside the engine compartment of a motor vehicle and ultimately falling from that vehicle. 

Currently, we are seeking funds for his vet care so any monetary help we can give is appreciated. You can send your checks with a ‘memo’ note that says ‘Second Chance Fund’ to:

Friends of Companion Animals

Attn: Second Chance Fund

2532 N. Dixie Hwy.

Monroe, MI 48162 

 

Below are some additional images but they are more graphic in nature. However, it illustrates the extent of his injuries and why funds for his care are desperately needed. 

 

 

Some Images Might be Unsettling

Trigger Warning

 

 

 

Friend of Companion Animals would like to offer our thanks to I want marketing.com. For every site they build for a business they also construct one for a local nonprofit animal organization. We are very honored and happy that they chose our feline rescue and adoption center.

Along with information about our facilities, this site will also include a list of our adoptable animals, which appear on Petfinder, in the coming weeks so stay tuned.

And if you are in need of a new website make sure to check them out because you’re not only helping a Monroe-based web design business you’re also helping other homeless pets in the process.

Friends of companion animals would like to thank all of the attendees of our fifth annual auction fundraiser, which was held Saturday, October 21, 2017. People came out to enjoy a delicious dinner and bed on a variety of items, from gift cards to local businesses to gift baskets and more.

As a completely volunteer run, nonprofit organization, all proceeds from our auctions go directly to support the care of our shelter and its felines. It’s always wonderful when people come out to support our endeavor of making Monroe County, MI free of homeless and unwanted cats.

So again, we like to extend our thanks to everyone who donated items and to everyone who show up for our events. Your generosity is greatly appreciated.

Barn Cats: Born to Be a Little Wild

 

Cats and barns have a symbolic relationship practically dating back to when man first began practicing agriculture. All of the stores of grain attracted rodents, which in turn, attracted feline hunters. Seeing their usefulness, farmers thought it might be a good idea to keep cats around and so began the domestication of these graceful, skilled hunters.

Though many cats are friendly and might be better at offering companionship than pest control, they are still, as a species, relatively new to the process of domestication. Some feral cats might remind you for a racoon than your fluffy house kitty. In between the lounging house cat and the street fighting alley cat, we have the timeless barn cat.

While we at Friends of Companion Animals always trying to find suitable homes for our feline wards, some cats are just happier when they aren’t confined indoors. They are not entirely feral and will typically tolerate some level of human interaction. These are the felines we find to be the happiest living in barns, hunting out pests and getting by with a little supervision and care from the lucky barn owners to whom they provide their services.

If you feel you could use the services of such a useful feline in exchange for shelter, food, and water, come visit our shelter and let one of our volunteers help find the right mouser for you. Just like the companion cats we care for, these barn cats are spayed or neutered and vaccinated before their re-homed. While we do not charge a fee for adopting these barn cats, we do appreciate donations to help offset the $100 in medical costs that make them ready for your barn or garage.

FIV Is NOT a Death Sentence

 

Most people tend to think that once aa cat is diagnosed with feline immunodeficiency virus the best course of action is euthanasia. While FIV is a lifelong disease and affected cats do require special attention, it hardly means the feline cannot live a fulfilling life without spreading the virus.

 

What is FIV?

 

FIV is commonly thought of as the feline form of HIV, but it’s only a risk to felines. Like HIV, it weakens the immune system, making infected cats more susceptible to other diseases. Unlike its more highly contagious cousin, feline leukemia, IV is mainly transmitted when an infected cat bites or scratches other cats earning it the title of a “fighting cats disease”. It can also be passed from mother to kittens, but only if the queen is infected while nursing or pregnant. 

 

What happens to  FIV infected cats?

 

Friendly cats continue to live a happy life for many years before the virus reaches its final, chronic clinical stage and the pet begins to show signs of illness. In the meantime, these cats are best kept indoors and away from other cats. This separation is not just to prevent the infected cat from spreading the virus, but also to protect the infected cats, with its weakened immune system, from contracting any other illnesses that other cats might be carrying. Some people might choose, in a situation where all cats are friendly and do not fight, to offer these special felines companionship by adopting multiple FIV cats. As long as they are monitored for any signs of sickness and kept away from potential sources of other diseases, they can live happily as typical house cats.

 

FOCA’s FIV Felines for Adoption

 

At our shelter, we have FIV cats for adoption. They are all extremely friendly with people, as well as other cats. We keep them away from the other shelter cats, more out of concern for their health than concerned that they might bite or scratch to pass the virus. If you can offer a safe, loving home with a little extra care, stop by our shelter and meet the sweethearts. They have as much love and life to offer as any other.