FOCA Announces Feral Spay /Neuter CLINIC Plans with Rummage Sale

 

RE: FOCA Announces Feral Spay /Neuter Plans with Rummage Sale
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Friends of Companion Animals, Monroe County’s only all cat rescue and adoption center, which rescued 33 cats at a single location in downtown Monroe in winter 2021, has a new venture – plans for a low cost feral spay/neuter clinic. The all-volunteer, nonprofit rescue established in 2011 is seeking donations to help fund the project, which would make it the only low-cost spay neuter clinic between Toledo and Downriver Detroit. They will kick off the endeavor by hosting an Indoor Rummage Sale fundraiser starting March 9th in their events building next to the shelter.

Director Penny Bly states, “The hoarding case we experience from last year is a prime example of how rapidly cats can reproduce and why we stress the importance of spaying and neutering pets, especially outdoor feral cats. Monroe, like most areas, has a serious overpopulation problem. As a rescue and adoption center, we find cats homes, but that’s only treating the symptom and not addressing the root problem. So, the only logical step is to host a spay neuter clinic in the events center next to the shelter.”

The clinic plans to serve only outdoor feral cats found by FOCA’s TNR program and by local Monroe County citizens who want to control the population of colonies they maintain. The cost is to be determined but it will include the spay/neuter, ear tip (where the top part of the ear is clipped to show it’s been altered) and a rabies vaccine. The low-cost service will try to remain competitively priced with nearby overworked low-cost clinics and help lessen their burden.

“Local low-cost clinics in southeast Michigan are overwhelmed. It can take weeks or months to get appointments because the need outweighs their resources through no fault of their own. The number of cats and people that need help are just enormous. But with financial support from the Monroe County community, and local businesses, Friends of Companion Animals will be able to help lighten the load and address the issue head on.”

Bly says at least four licensed veterinarians said they support the clinic idea and plan to be a part of the solution by performing the surgeries. She adds, “At first the clinic will be doing monthly or bi-monthly appointments. However, before we get to that point, there are supplies we need to acquire to get started — that includes everything from surgical instruments to patient tracking software and that’s where our fundraiser comes into play.”

Starting March 9th through the 13th and then again March 16th to the 20th, FOCA will have their Indoor Rummage Sale. It’s a rain or shine event where everything that’s raised will go toward the evolution of the new spay neuter clinic. In addition to the usual resale shop items, the sale plans to feature items not normally found in their store like furniture, office equipment, linens and other odds and ends. As for when the clinic will open, Bly says that depends on how much they raise and how soon.

“Essentially, the more donors we have who support the project, the sooner the clinic doors will open to area residents. We realize that times are tough financially for many people, but we’re hopeful that those who have the means – whether it’s individuals or businesses – will see the necessity here and contribute to the cause.”

Bly points out that the reason for this clinic doesn’t just benefit people who care for cats but the entire community. She says, “As a whole, it’s better for everybody when overpopulation is brought under control. We truly believe that together we can all make a difference because even five dollars from one person here and one person there really adds up quick and proves that even a small donation can make a large impact.”

To learn more or to contribute to the cause visit their site at www.friendsofcompanionanimals.org today.

FIV Is NOT a Death Sentence

 

Most people tend to think that once aa cat is diagnosed with feline immunodeficiency virus the best course of action is euthanasia. While FIV is a lifelong disease and affected cats do require special attention, it hardly means the feline cannot live a fulfilling life without spreading the virus.

 

What is FIV?

 

FIV is commonly thought of as the feline form of HIV, but it’s only a risk to felines. Like HIV, it weakens the immune system, making infected cats more susceptible to other diseases. Unlike its more highly contagious cousin, feline leukemia, IV is mainly transmitted when an infected cat bites or scratches other cats earning it the title of a “fighting cats disease”. It can also be passed from mother to kittens, but only if the queen is infected while nursing or pregnant. 

 

What happens to  FIV infected cats?

 

Friendly cats continue to live a happy life for many years before the virus reaches its final, chronic clinical stage and the pet begins to show signs of illness. In the meantime, these cats are best kept indoors and away from other cats. This separation is not just to prevent the infected cat from spreading the virus, but also to protect the infected cats, with its weakened immune system, from contracting any other illnesses that other cats might be carrying. Some people might choose, in a situation where all cats are friendly and do not fight, to offer these special felines companionship by adopting multiple FIV cats. As long as they are monitored for any signs of sickness and kept away from potential sources of other diseases, they can live happily as typical house cats.

 

FOCA’s FIV Felines for Adoption

 

At our shelter, we have FIV cats for adoption. They are all extremely friendly with people, as well as other cats. We keep them away from the other shelter cats, more out of concern for their health than concerned that they might bite or scratch to pass the virus. If you can offer a safe, loving home with a little extra care, stop by our shelter and meet the sweethearts. They have as much love and life to offer as any other.